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International Women's Day

Friday 8th March 2019

To celebrate International Women’s Day, we spoke to a number of our inspirational female team members about why they love working for the charity, some of their greatest achievements, and what advice they’d give to others wanting to work for MAAC!

Sarah Folley, critical care paramedic

1. Why did you want to work with MAAC?

MAAC really can make a difference between life and death. Working for them is a privilege as I get to see this first hand every single shift. The fact that 90 per cent of the region is within reach by helicopter within eight minutes makes this service vital but the really special thing is that it only made possible by charitable donations from the public. As Paramedics for MAA we have a responsibility to ensure we help deliver this service ensuring each and ever pound donated is put to good use in delivering first class patient care.

2. Your greatest achievement 

I feel blessed to have three lovely children and they are by far my greatest achievement. They in turn believe that mummy's greatest achievement is to work with Midlands Air Ambulance providing lifesaving treatment at the scene of an emergency. Hopefully I've inspired them to believe they can achieved anything when they are older, my youngest wants to become a pilot to fly mummy around at work!

3. What is the biggest challenge working for MAAC?

Sometimes we all see things that are really sad, it helps by always delivering our best treatment and skill on each and every patient we see. It makes me appreciate each and ever day as we are constantly reminded that life is short and we really must enjoy every second, this is why I have chosen to do a job that I love and that is so rewarding.

4. What advice would you give fellow women looking to become a paramedic. What qualities do you need?

My only advice is to believe in yourself and never give up. I had been employed by the ambulance service for 21 years before I started working with the charity and it has took a lot of hard work and dedication to work for such an amazing service. If you stay determined and are prepared to think outside the box a little then anything is possible- even becoming a HEMs Paramedic.

5. What do you do to distress and unwind?

I love walking and go to the gym whenever I'm off work. I get lost in the world of audio books and enjoy spending time with my family. I try to encourage an active lifestyle for the whole family so we try to spend time together outdoors enjoying the local countryside.

 

Pam Seniore, finance assistant

1. Why did you want to work with MAAC?

I love charity work, giving is good!

2. Your greatest achievement 

The Great North Run, singing in a band, climbing Crib Goch, (Snowdon Ridge), completing The Three Peaks - take your pick!

3. What advice would you give fellow women looking to work in your position? What qualities do you need?

You need to be conscientious, trustworthy and accurate.

4. Who is your inspiration?

Female yachtswoman, Ellen MacArthur.

5. What’s your secret talent?

Cooking

6. What do you do to distress and unwind?

Walk my dog, Rupert.

 

Erin Hughes, regional fundraising executive 

1. Why did you want to work with MAAC?

When I decided to go back to work after having my son, I was only willing to leave him for a job with a charity, doing something which I was really passionate about. When I saw a job opportunity at MAAC I knew that it was a job I would be passionate about and love, so it was an easy decision.

2. Your greatest achievement 

My greatest achievement is my son, Artie. In particular, one day when a child his age was crying in a queue, just very bored, and Artie gave him a cuddle and then started pulling imaginary sweets from his pocket and giving them to this little boy. I was just glowing that he wanted to help make this little boy happy.

3. What is the biggest challenge working for MAAC?

I genuinely don’t feel like I face any major challenges working for MAAC! I love what I do and I feel really proud of it. I suppose it’s managing my own expectations – I just want to do the best job possible and make lots of money to keep the helicopters flying!

4. What advice would you give fellow women looking to work in your position? What qualities do you need?

To fellow women who want to work in the same role – you absolutely can do it! Don’t doubt your abilities or think it is beyond you. The most important quality in this job is to be personable, friendly and sociable. I thought I was incapable of juggling motherhood and full time work, and women are told you have to make a choice between children and career, but it’s a lie, especially at MAAC!

5. Who is your inspiration?

My inspirations are many. I’ve been lucky enough to be surrounded by hard-working, amazing women all my life. I think, though, if I had to pick one I’d say Malala Yousafzai. In a place that told her she couldn’t, she did, even when it meant risking her own life to make a better world for the girls who came next.

6. What’s your secret talent?

My secret talent – my singing isn’t much of a secret!!

7. What do you do to distress and unwind?

To distress and unwind, I play my piano, and I read (when I get the chance!) I also love to go walking on Cannock Chase or down the canal path in Stafford, whatever the weather. It’s just relaxing and peaceful.

 

Fay Pollock, critical care paramedic

1. Why did you want to work with MAAC?

Quite literally to provide the best and most optimal care to our patients.

2. Your greatest achievement 

My greatest achievement is to get on the helicopter, I think I told my mum when I was about ten years old when I aircraft flew over our garden ‘I want to be on that mum!’ 30 years later and I am! And there’s not one single day that I don’t thank my little stars. In my personal life my greatest achievement has to be having a fabulous life, fabulous family, fabulous bunch of friends and fabulous job...what more can a person ask for?

3. What is the biggest challenge working for MAAC?

The biggest challenge has to be continually keeping up with the most recent clinical and medical pre-hospital treatment. The medical profession is like a steam train as we learn more and more about the human body and its effect after treatment.

4. What advice would you give fellow women looking to work in your position? What qualities do you need?

Do it! It’s like having a second family!

5. What do you do to distress and unwind?

I do a lot of running and fitness to help me unwind and distress, it is just lovely to go out on a cold winters morning before the rest of the world is awake and catch the frost crisp and undisturbed.

 

 

 

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